Style & Innovation

Vogue x NDC present first-of-its-kind Diamond Festival

Riveting conversations on natural diamonds with some of the world’s most eminent experts.

Vogue x NDC present first-of-its-kind Diamond Festival

All the highlights from the first-ever Vogue and Natural Diamond Council Diamond Festival that you need to catch up on 

The Diamond Festival, a unique event that was the first of its kind both in India and globally, focused on important conversations in the industry. The two days of special programming had appearances and discussions from the world’s foremost experts, who voiced their perspectives on the magic and power of the diamond. On August 20 and 21, the inaugural Vogue India and Natural Diamond Council’s Diamond Festival, the online edit, streamed live across Vogue India’s social media channels.  

The expert panellists brought their viewpoint to important conversations that the diamond and jewellery industry have all been having. For instance, what constitutes a modern heirloom? What is a sneak peak into the history of royal jewellery like?  The reason behind the rise of gender-fluid jewellery. Millennials and their love for minimalistic diamonds. How to style T-shirt diamonds, and much more. Jewellery expert Katerina Perez and long-time editor Nonita Kalra highlighted the best of diamond trends to look forward to. From shoulder-dusters to the statement cuff, they shared their predictions on future diamond trends.   

We opened the festival with a conversation between Vogue India’s editor-in-chief Priya Tanna and Richa Singh, managing director, Natural Diamond Council. In their chat, Priya and Richa took us back to the genesis of this event and discussed the panels they were looking forward to, as well as touched upon the modern woman’s relationship with her diamonds. From memories of their first diamond pieces to the pandemic and what it has taught us about consumption, the ladies discussed it all.  

From Milan, Bulgari’s creative director for jewellery, Lucia Silvestri; and Nonita Kalra spoke about the modern heirlooms. Designer Valérie Messika shared her strong female influences; in Mumbai, actor Kiara Advani, fresh off the success of her movie SherShaah, discussed Bollywood’s love for jewellery; and closing the show, from his wood-panelled study in Kolkata, designer-of-the-moment Sabyasachi Mukherjee talks about the versatility of diamonds Actor Aditi Rao Hydari poetically reminisced about playing dress up with her cousins, with unlimited access to her grandmother’s jewellery box, a relationship that has led to a deep love and appreciation for natural diamonds and heirloom jewellery. Fashion stylist Anaita Shroff Adajania joined in for a live session on styling diamonds with a simple tee, followed by a session on the growing popularity of purchasing diamonds online by Mithun Sacheti, CEO, Caratlane, and fashion entrepreneurs and influencers Pernia Qureshi and Amrita Thakur. Influencer Masoom Minawala’s relationship with diamonds is incredibly personal. Hailing from a jeweller family, she discussed what makes it to her treasure chest and why. And who can forget the key role engagement rings play in increasing the growing allure of natural diamonds, as American designer Stephanie Gottlieb conversed with stylist Archana Walavalkar on how to select and stack the perfect engagement ring.  

If you weren’t able to catch your favourite session over the weekend, head to Vogue India’s Instagram, Facebook and YouTube channel to immerse yourself in this one-of-a-kind experience. Here’s some highlights for you from the sessions.  

Kiara Advani, Actor

“The first piece of jewellery I bought for myself was a pair of solitaires, but I thought the beauty of it would be in gifting them to my mum. After that, whatever I’ve bought has been customised— very wearable, everyday stuff.”

Sabyasachi Mukherjee, Designer, Fine Jewellery & Couture

“The younger generation has oodles of confidence and I want to create jewellery that is a homage to that confidence.” 

Aditi Rao Hydari, Actor

“My [maternal] grandfather gave me a piece [of jewellery] that belonged to my great-grandmother. It was a large set, similar to a Satlada, but my grandfather converted it into smaller pieces and gave one to each of us. It was actually given to my great-grandmother when she was really young. I wear it now, and even when I was a teenager because it’s simple and pretty, and very wearable.”

Aditi Rao Hydari, Actor

“My [maternal] grandfather gave me a piece [of jewellery] that belonged to my great-grandmother. It was a large set, similar to a Satlada, but my grandfather converted it into smaller pieces and gave one to each of us. It was actually given to my great-grandmother when she was really young. I wear it now, and even when I was a teenager because it’s simple and pretty, and very wearable.”

H.H. Maharani Radhikaraje Gaekwad Of Baroda

“Jewellery was and is meant to imply power and prestige, and important pieces were picked up by important members of royal families. There has always been the desire to own important stones.”

Valérie Messika, Artistic Director, Messika Jewellery

 “The modern heirloom can be worn in a cool and casual way, while at the same time being sophisticated. For me, it’s most important that a diamond helps you feel feminine and secure about yourself.”

Nonita Kalra, Editor-in-chief, Tata Cliq Luxury

“We grow up with so much storytelling around our jewellery. From the time you’re a little girl, your mother will put out a piece that was your grandmother’s and say ‘this belongs to you’. We form an attachment to the stones. They’re not just stones—they become our mothers and grandmothers.”

 

Gaurav Gupta, Fashion & Jewellery Designer

“My grandfather gave me a piece [of jewellery] that belonged to my great-grandmother. It was a large set that my grandfather converted into smaller pieces and gave one to me. I wear it now, and wore it even when I was a teenager because it’s simple and pretty, and very wearable.”

Lucia Silvestri Jewellery Creative Director, Bvlgari Jewellery

“The natural cut and touch of the diamond is very important as they are forever.”

Francesca Cartier Brickell, Bestselling Author, ‘The Cartiers’

“Each jewel tells a different story. It’s rarely in the same hands forever. It gets passed around, either down the generations or it gets passed as we go through cataclysmic world events.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hanut Singh, Jewellery Designer

“My education on jewellery comes from the pieces my family adorned so my designs weave together the past and the present. The common link between men and women buyers is the emotional value of diamonds which I think is powerful and endearing.”

Hamish Bowles International Editor At Large, US Vogue

“Each piece of mine speaks about travel, friendships, love, and family and that is what I would like to bring back to the jewellery ethos of today. From Maharaja and the Mughal bling to the charm of trinkets, I’d love to see it all becoming a part of my jewellery repertoire.”