Epic Diamonds

A Record-Breaking 236-Carat Color Diamond Is Unearthed in Russia

Fancy colored diamonds are rare and exceptional, so when one of golf ball size is discovered, it’s truly a reason to celebrate.

A Record-Breaking 236-Carat Color Diamond Is Unearthed in Russia

Fancy colored diamonds are rare and exceptional, so when one of golf ball size is discovered, it’s truly a reason to celebrate. We’re talking about the 236 carat, 500 million year old intense yellow-brown rough natural diamond that was recently unearthed from the remote Ebelyakh mine (operated by Almazy Anabara, a division of ALROSA, one of the world’s leading diamond producers) on the Anabar River in Yakutia, Russia.

No stranger to highly impressive stones, the Ebelyakh alluvial diamond deposit has produced some of the most exceptional fancy colored diamonds over the past three years: Last year, it unearthed a 34.17 carat yellow rough diamond, which after cutting and polishing, became a 20.69 carat fancy vivid yellow diamond named Firebird, purchased by Graff purchased in January. Three years ago, the mine even produced three special colored stones—yellow, pink and purple-pink—in a single month.

Measuring in at 47 by 24 by 22 millimeters, Ebelyakh’s latest extraordinary gem has the potential to yield several high-quality polished diamonds. “Such a large natural color rough diamond is a unique discovery,” said Pavel Vinikhin, head of the ALROSA cutting and polishing division.

However, beyond its jaw-dropping size and color, the marvel has even greater significance.

The stone has officially been named Diamond That Cares after ALROSA’s social action initiative and the namesake jewelry brand that supports it by giving three percent of its annual revenue to charitable projects; thus far the Diamonds That Care initiative has allocated $150 million for such causes, with $338,781 (through the sale of three Anna Hu diamond jewelry designs at a Christie’s charity auction) contributed in July 2020 alone. These specific funds were donated to the Brave of Heart Fund, which offers financial and emotional support to the families of frontline healthcare workers and volunteers who have lost their lives fighting COVID-19.

It’s worth noting that previously this summer, Diamonds That Care also partnered with Brilliant Earth to launch a limited-edition collection with part of the proceeds going to Feeding America’s COVID-19 Response Fund, the nation’s largest domestic hunger-relief organization. Additionally, the company donated $7 million for medicine and equipment for local community hospitals to help COVID-19, and remains committed to its annual $80 million contribution to environmental projects, including the protection of reindeer and populating rivers with fish.

So as the company decides whether to sell its Diamond that Cares as a rough diamond or cut the stone at its in-house facility, it’s safe to say that its proceeds will definitely go to something brilliant.